“The ban on new foreign repair station certificates is having a detrimental impact on U.S.-based aerospace companies looking to tap into rapidly expanding overseas markets. The longer the prohibition is in effect, the more damage it will cause our nation’s competitiveness in aviation and exports,” the groups told Napolitano. 

In 2003, Congress enacted VISION-100 – Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act, which required the TSA to issue security rules for all aviation repair stations by August 2004. When TSA failed to meet that deadline, lawmakers (in the 9/11 Recommendation Implementation Act) demanded the security regulations be completed by August 2008. The penalty for failure to comply: the FAA was barred from issuing new foreign repair station certifications.

ARSA has long decried the punishment of an entire industry due to a delayed rulemaking and has led the charge to end the prohibition. Rather than encourage the agency to act, the ban has only punished the aviation industry and weakened U.S. leadership in aviation maintenance services.

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Filed under: Aviation News